Tag Archives: lpsf

SF Weekly on Central Subway: “The Canary is Dead”

Joe Eskenazi of SF Weekly blasts the SFMTA’s Chinatown Central Subway project as a budget-busting (and foot-busting) nightmare: A map and chart obtained from Muni via a public records request breaks down this journey into what may well be the … Continue reading

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The Metadata Surveillance State

The Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald broke a massive story this week by publishing a blatantly unconstitutional, secret court order that directed Verizon Wireless to disclose daily records of every phone call made by every single one of its customers. The administration has responded, claiming that it has the need and the right to monitor everything you do for no reason at all, so long as the government’s own secret courts agree it might prevent a terrorist attack. A lot of the reporting since has focused on the distinction between phone records (“metadata”) and calls themselves (“content”). That distinction isn’t worth the (classified) paper it’s printed on. Continue reading

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The Fed is Killing Small Banks

Today, four years since the official bottom of the 2007-2009 recession and financial crisis, you can add a surprising voice to the list of those still waiting for a recovery: America’s small banks. As CNNMoney’s Stephen Gandel notes, the banking recovery has been uneven; small lenders are still in trouble, and some continue to fail even as loan quality at larger institutions has rebounded sharply. The U.S. banking sector is becoming a two-class system: big banks are getting bigger, and small local banks are dying. Large banks are driving a Wal-Martization of the banking sector. As with Wal-Mart, the implications for Americans’ standard of living are not good. Continue reading

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Leave Self-Driving Cars Alone, NHTSA!

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has proposed new federal rules for autonomous (aka “self-driving”) vehicles, far in advance of any automaker’s plans to introduce even one of these vehicles into the market. It is a statement to the extent of the United States Government’s overgrowth that detailed regulation of unmarketed and unannounced products is not immediately rejected as an absurd waste of tax dollars. Such regulation should almost always be rejected on principle, and this case is a great example. Continue reading

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